Tag Archives: 100% free software

OpenBSD 6.2 Released!

The project has released OpenBSD 6.2 which features many new drivers, particularly for the ARM architecture, and network packet handling performance improvements. Some key features have been added to the system installer too, including checking for security updates on the system’s first boot: “Installer improvements: The installer now uses the Allotment Routing Table (ART). A unique kernel is now created by the installer to boot from after install/upgrade. On release installs of architectures supported by syspatch, “syspatch -c” is now added to rc.firsttime. Backwards compatibility code to support the ‘rtsol’ keyword in hostname.if(5) has been removed. The install.site and upgrade.site scripts are now executed at the end of the install/upgrade process. More detailed information is shown to identify disks. The IPv6 default router selection has been fixed. On the amd64 platform, AES-NI is used if present.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Coming in December

Upgrade Guide: 6.1 to 6.2

OpenBSD/macppc 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/arm64 6.2Installation Notes

Packages

Quick install instructions

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

 

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OpenBSD 6.1 Officially Released

The OpenBSD developers have announced the availability of a new stable release of their security-oriented operating system. The new release, OpenBSD 6.1, introduces bug fixes, several new or improved hardware drivers and security enhancements to the system installer. “Installer improvements: The installer now uses privilege separation for fetching and verifying the install sets. Install sets are now fetched over an HTTPS connection by default when using a mirror that supports it. The installer now considers all of the DHCP information in file name, boot file-name, server-name, tftp-server-name, and next-server when attempting to do automatic installs or upgrades. The installer no longer adds a route to an alias IP via 127.0.0.1, due to improvements in the kernel routing components.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Winter of 95

Upgrade Guide: 6.0 to 6.1

OpenBSD/macppc 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/arm64 6.1Installation Notes

Packages

Quick install instructions

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

Mageia 5.1 released!

mageia5

03 December 2016 – Donald Stewart has announced the release of Mageia 5.1, an updated build of the distribution current stable branch. This unscheduled version was put together due to delays delivering the upcoming Mageia 6 which is currently in development. From the release announcement: “We are very pleased to announce the release of Mageia 5.1. This release is a respin of the Mageia 5 installation and live ISO images, based on the Mageia 5 repository and incorporating all updates to allow for an up-to-date installation without the need to install almost a year-and-a-half worth of updates. It is therefore recommended for new installations and upgrades from Mageia 4. If you are currently running Mageia 5 then there is no need to install Mageia 5.1 as it is the same as your system, provided that updates have been installed. Mageia 5.1 ships with many updated packages, including LibreOffice 4.4.7, Linux kernel 4.4.32, KDE4 4.14.5, GNOME 3.14.3 and countless other updates.

Release announcement

Release Notes

Errata

Support

Community

Mageia Documentation

Mageia’s Archive

Contribute

Applications Database

Donate

Contact

Upgrade from Mageia 4

Download Classical ISO 32 bit (to install Mageia directly)

Download Classical ISO 64 bit (to install Mageia directly)

Download Live ISO’s KDE Desktop 32 bit (to try Mageia)

Download Live ISO’s KDE Desktop 64 bit (to try Mageia)

Download Live ISO’s GNOME Desktop 32 bit (to try Mageia)

Download Live ISO’s GNOME Desktop 64 bit (to try Mageia)

Download Network Install 32 bit with Only Free Software

Download Network Install 64 bit with Only Free Software

Download Network Install 32 bit with Nonfree Firmware

Download Network Install 64 bit with Nonfree Firmware

Wiki – NetInstall ISO with Boot

GET ISO on USB Flash Drive

star_mageia

 

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

OpenBSD 6.0 Officially Released

openbsd_puffy60

The OpenBSD project has announced the release of OpenBSD 6.0. The OpenBSD project focuses on providing code and documentation that are correct and of high quality. This has lead to OpenBSD being regarded as a highly secure and reliable operating system. The new release features New/extended platforms: for armv7 – EFI bootloader added, kernels are now loaded from FFS instead of FAT or EXT filesystems, without U-Boot headers, a single kernel and ramdisk are now used for all SoCs, Miniroot installer images include U-Boot 2016.07 with support for EFI payloads, vax removed. Many new and improved hardware drivers and support for hardware-reduced ACPI implementations, for ACPI 5.0 implementations, initial support for MSI-X has been added, the xhci(4) driver now performs handoff from an xHCI-capable BIOS correctly, W^X is now strictly enforced by default etc.. Updated versions of LibreSSL and OpenSSH are included as well and feature several security enhancements.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Another Smash of the Stack

Song – Black Hat

Song – Money

Song – Comfortably Dumb (the misc song)

Song – Mother

Song – Goodbye

Upgrade Guide: 5.9 to 6.0

openbsd_banner

Download and install:

OpenBSD/macppc 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/luna88k 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/zaurus 6.0Installation Notes

Quick install instructions

openbsd_blackhat

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

OpenBSD 5.9 – The new stable release

puffy59

The OpenBSD project has announced the release of OpenBSD 5.9. The OpenBSD project focuses on providing code and documentation that are correct and of high quality. This has lead to OpenBSD being regarded as a highly secure and reliable operating system. The new release features W^X (write or execute) security for 32-bit x86 processors, many new and improved hardware drivers and support for installing OpenBSD on GPT partitioned hard drives. This release features a forked version of the “less” command and network stack improvements. Updated versions of LibreSSL and OpenSSH are included as well and feature several security enhancements.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Doctor W^X

Song – Systemagic (Anniversary Edition)

Packages and Ports

 

openbsd_banner

Download and install:

OpenBSD/macppc 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 5.9 — Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armish 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 5.9 — Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 5.9 — Installation Notes

OpenBSD/luna88k 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 5.9 — Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc 5.9Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 5.9 — Installation Notes

OpenBSD/zaurus 5.9Installation Notes

Quick install instructions

systemmagic_right

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

Guix System Distribution 0.10.0 – GNU/Linux

Guix-System-Distribution

Ludovic Courtès has announced the release of a new version of the Guix System Distribution (GuixSD).
GuixSD is a GNU/Linux distribution committed to respecting and enhancing the freedom of its users. As such, it adheres to the GNU Free System Distribution Guidelines.
GNU Guix is a functional package manager for the GNU system. In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, except that packages are defined as native Guile modules, using extensions to the Scheme language. GuixSD offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management, and is highly customizable and hackable.
As of version 0.10.0, the Guix System Distribution can be installed on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It uses the Linux-Libre kernel and the GNU Shepherd init system. Alternately, its package manager, GNU Guix, can be installed as an additional package manager on top of an installed Linux-based system.
It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el and armv7.
Ludovic Courtès has announced the release of a new version. It offers reproducible builds for several key packages, plus the GNOME desktop environment and over 600 new packages in the project’s repositories. “It’s been almost five months since the previous release, and many things happened! The highlights include: Our grafting mechanism for security updates has been fixed to be generally applicable. Read this post for more information on the challenges behind this. Substitutes are now fetched by default over HTTPS and from a faster mirror. A number of packages have been made bit-for-bit reproducible, including glibc, Perl, Emacs packages, and Python packages. This work was simplified by Guix challenge and by the new –check and –rounds build options, and also by the insight gathered from other reproducible builds efforts. GNOME is now available, via the gnome-desktop-service procedure. 639 new packages, about as many package updates, greatly simplified by the addition of new importers and auto-updaters. A wealth of bug fixes, documentation improvements, Emacs niceties, and more!

The release announcement

Official notes

Packages

Contact

Help

GuixSD Manual

GNU Guix Manual

Download

P.S.

Guix is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

 

Happy GuixSD  😀

Introduction to NGINX – eBook for FREE

NGINX

Nginx is an open source HTTP and reverse proxy server, as well as a mail proxy server, load balancer, and HTTP cache. The nginx project started with a strong focus on high concurrency, high performance and low memory usage.
This ebook will introduce you to the magic of Nginx. You will learn to install and configure nginx for a variety of software platforms and how to integrate it with Apache. Additionally, you will get involved with more advanced concepts like Load Balancing, SSL configuration and Websockets proxying.
With this free eBook you will also receive weekly news, tips and special offers delivered to your inbox courtesy of System Code Geeks.

Get this eBook for FREE here!

Read the instructions and done. The time is limited, hurry up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Reading  😀

OpenBSD 5.8 released! Support for many architectures – The 20th anniversary of the source tree

openbsd_puffy58

In the 20th anniversary of the OpenBSD source tree, Theo de Raadt has announced the release of OpenBSD 5.8. The OpenBSD project focuses on providing code and documentation that are correct and of high quality. This has lead to OpenBSD being regarded as a highly secure and reliable operating system. The new release features several new or improved drivers, the sudo command has been replaced with doas and some of the system installer’s default settings have been changed. “We are pleased to announce the official release of OpenBSD 5.8. This is our 38th release on CD-ROM (and 39th via FTP/HTTP). We remain proud of OpenBSD’s record of twenty years with only two remote holes in the default install. As in our previous releases, 5.8 provides significant improvements, including new features, in nearly all areas of the system.

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Release announcement and quick installer information

Listen the new songs

 

open_bsd_banner

Download and install:

OpenBSD/macppc 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armish 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/socppc 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/vax 5.8Installation Notes

OpenBSD/zaurusInstallation Notes

Quick install instructions

 

 

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

Mageia 5 finally is here! Change your perspective..

mageia5

Rémi Verschelde has announced the release of Mageia 5. Mageia is a community distribution which started as a fork of the Mandriva project, but which now operates as an independent distribution. The new release features UEFI support (though not Secure Boot), version 3.19 of the Linux kernel, KDE 4.14 and GNOME 3.14. Cinnamon, MATE, Plasma, LXQt and Xfce desktop are also available. The installation on UEFI machines is now supported out of the box, grub2 (optional and not the default) should now work better out of the box, detect other installed operating systems and add them to grub2 boot menu, Lots of bug fixes in the installer and the control center, including bugs dating back from before the Mageia fork that the work on UEFI support made prominent.                                               Btrfs is now supported as a primary filesystem, though ext4 remains the default – when selecting it for /boot (or / without a separate /boot partition) grub2 will be automatically chosen and configured. We now use the standard Adwaita theme instead of Oxygen-gtk, as the latter is broken with gtk+-3.14.
Packaging:
  • We now use the new standard for weak dependencies.
  • Our packages’ spec files use the new standard for dependencies exclusion (making them more similar to Fedora/Suse/etc. packages).
Installation media, live discs and a network install ISO are offered as download options. More information on the new version of Mageia can be found in the project’s release announcement

Release Notes

Errata

Download New Release

This release has the network installation, you can choose the Free Software CD or NonFree Firmware CD.

star_mageia

 

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

 

 

 

Debian GNU/Hurd 2015 released

GNU_HURD

The GNU H is what is commonly meant when people are talking about GNU/Hurd systems.
This system has mostly been designed and implemented It works and is usable. For example, these web pages have been rendered on a GNU/Hurd system.
You can try it out for yourself: for getting access, installing Debian GNU/Hurd will probably be the easiest and most feature-complete solution. If you don’t have spare hardware to use for doing so, you can also get a shell account on a public Hurd machine. Depending on the things you’re going to work on (and on your internet connection), this may be an easy way of getting used to Hurd systems. Installing in a virtual machine is another possibility, see the page about running a Hurd system for the full story. In particular, running a Debian GNU/Hurd QEMU image may be a viable alternative.
it is mostly based on the same sources. It is not an official Debian release, but it is an official Debian GNU/Hurd port release.

From Wikipedia

History

Announcement

Install Hurd

Download GNU/Hurd for i386

 

Happy GNU/Hurd  😀