Tag Archives: unix based

OpenBSD 6.2 Released!

The project has released OpenBSD 6.2 which features many new drivers, particularly for the ARM architecture, and network packet handling performance improvements. Some key features have been added to the system installer too, including checking for security updates on the system’s first boot: “Installer improvements: The installer now uses the Allotment Routing Table (ART). A unique kernel is now created by the installer to boot from after install/upgrade. On release installs of architectures supported by syspatch, “syspatch -c” is now added to rc.firsttime. Backwards compatibility code to support the ‘rtsol’ keyword in hostname.if(5) has been removed. The install.site and upgrade.site scripts are now executed at the end of the install/upgrade process. More detailed information is shown to identify disks. The IPv6 default router selection has been fixed. On the amd64 platform, AES-NI is used if present.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Coming in December

Upgrade Guide: 6.1 to 6.2

OpenBSD/macppc 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 6.2Installation Notes

OpenBSD/arm64 6.2Installation Notes

Packages

Quick install instructions

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

 

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Linux Mint 18.2 “Sonya” LTS released

Clement Lefebvre has announced the availability of a new release of Linux Mint. The new version, Linux Mint 18.2, is the latest update in the 18.x series and is built upon a base of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The new release will be supported until 2021 and is available in four editions (Cinnamon, KDE, MATE and Xfce). Linux Mint 18.2 features improvements to the X-Apps cross-desktop applications with improved short-cuts coming to the Xplayer video player and line sorting coming to the Xed text editor. The login screen is now powered by LightDM running the Slick greeter and includes support for HiDPI. The update manager has been tweaked to help users find their ideal balance between security updates and system stability: “The Update Manager received many improvements. It still has the same mission and tackles the same issues as before (keeping your computer safe, providing bug fixes and protecting you from regressions) but it presents things slightly differently. Policies and level definitions were refined to better filter updates depending on their level of impact on the operating system and without worrying about their origin. Most updates are now level 2. Application updates which do not impact the OS are level 1. Toolkits and desktop environments or libraries which affect multiple applications are level 3. Kernels and sensitive system updates are level 4. Level 5 is extremely rare and not used by default. This level is dedicated to flagging dangerous or broken updates.

Release Notes to:

Linux Mint 18.2 Cinnamon 3.4

Linux Mint 18.2 KDE Plasma 5.8

Linux Mint 18.2 MATE 1.18

Linux Mint 18.2 Xfce 4.12

Documentation

Project

FAQ

Download Linux Mint 18.2 Cinnamon 32 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 Cinnamon 64 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 MATE 32 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 MATE 64 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 Xfce 32 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 Xfce 64 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 KDE 32 bit

Download Linux Mint 18.2 KDE 64 bit

The SHA256 sums to check the integrity of the ISO images:

c8c92c131a8be74ae45bce61f002633cd2755ca7318a337dca8a14ff1c8e16a0 *linuxmint-18.2-cinnamon-32bit.iso
d50e69a3e6d6b9d4b9cbe56cd3736cef665b708a4a2e5d9024f8eef439a91bba *linuxmint-18.2-cinnamon-64bit.iso
6df26cf2e7dacfdcdc5ab2b776505d9999304748f48fa3a4e1ef3463fcf04631 *linuxmint-18.2-kde-32bit.iso
9173901fbead7d2ece2454f8f51dbb375e1dfdfc74cfaef450342a3144955fe1 *linuxmint-18.2-kde-64bit.iso
f706000aba58ed5ef890bdacb01943c107a290a50917c453d45e314a92b74dea *linuxmint-18.2-mate-32bit.iso
1e5110d58794634ba935678825ce0d5279daa03d41c81226a871e8497e3cc35a *linuxmint-18.2-mate-64bit.iso
c4514d8d97f0a54219c1f9ce2911f2544f6ae781aae6f49fdef904e7360ae46b *linuxmint-18.2-xfce-32bit.iso
2dcf4ccd76657d42c7e4f14e9e237da9ab0a07028b5ba63a95262a7052f96e9b *linuxmint-18.2-xfce-64bit.iso

Main components

Linux Mint 18.2 with Linux kernel 4.8 and an Ubuntu 16.04 package base.

LTS strategy

Linux Mint 18.2 will receive security updates until 2021.
Until 2018, future versions of Linux Mint will use the same package base as Linux Mint 18, making it trivial for people to upgrade.
Until 2018, the development team won’t start working on a new base and will be fully focused on this one.

 

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

Ubuntu 17.04 “Zesty Zapus” Released

Adam Conrad has announced the release of Ubuntu 17.04. The latest release of Ubuntu features nine months of support and security updates. The new release includes version 4.10 of the Linux kernel as well as driverless printing to supported devices. Support for 32-bit PowerPC computers has been dropped and new installations will, by default, be set up using a swap file instead of a swap partition for added flexibility. “Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.10-based kernel, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has seen incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK+ and Qt, updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice, and stability improvements to Unity. Ubuntu Server 17.04 includes the Ocata release of OpenStack, alongside deployment and management tools that save DevOps teams time when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds, public clouds, x86, ARM, or POWER servers, zSystem mainframes, or on developer laptops.

The project’s release announcement

ReleaseNotes

Upgrading from Ubuntu 16.10

Linux Kernel 4.10

Desktop

Server

Official flavours

Ubuntu 17.04 Desktop 64

Ubuntu 17.04 Server 64

Ubuntu 17.04 Desktop i386

Ubuntu 17.04 Server i386

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot 64

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot i386

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot ARM64/ARMv8

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot ARMHF/ARMv7 1

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot ARMHF/ARMv7 2

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot PowerPC64EL/POWER8 Little-Endian

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot PowerPC 64 bit Big-Endian

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot PowerPC e500mc Big-Endian

Ubuntu 17.04 Netboot s390x IBM system z

Ubuntu 17.04 Server 64 bit ARM 64

Ubuntu 17.04 Server PowerPC64 Little-Endian

Ubuntu 17.04 Server IBM z series mainframes (LinuxONE)

Kubuntu 17.04 Desktop 64

Kubuntu 17.04 Desktop i386

Xubuntu 17.04 Desktop 64

Xubuntu 17.04 Desktop i386

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Desktop 64

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Desktop i386

Ubuntu Studio 17.04 64

Ubuntu Studio 17.04 i386

Ubuntu Kylin 17.04 64

Ubuntu Kylin 17.04 i386

Lubuntu 17.04 64

Lubuntu 17.04 i386

Lubuntu 17.04 Alternate 64 (for low ram)

Lubuntu 17.04 Alternate i386

Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 i386

Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 64

Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 64

Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 i386

Ubuntu Cloud Image

MinimalCD

Usb Image Writing Guide

-= Ubuntu 17.04 will be supported for 9 months until January 2018. If you need Long Term Support, it is recommended you use Ubuntu 16.04 LTS instead.

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

OpenBSD 6.1 Officially Released

The OpenBSD developers have announced the availability of a new stable release of their security-oriented operating system. The new release, OpenBSD 6.1, introduces bug fixes, several new or improved hardware drivers and security enhancements to the system installer. “Installer improvements: The installer now uses privilege separation for fetching and verifying the install sets. Install sets are now fetched over an HTTPS connection by default when using a mirror that supports it. The installer now considers all of the DHCP information in file name, boot file-name, server-name, tftp-server-name, and next-server when attempting to do automatic installs or upgrades. The installer no longer adds a route to an alias IP via 127.0.0.1, due to improvements in the kernel routing components.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Winter of 95

Upgrade Guide: 6.0 to 6.1

OpenBSD/macppc 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 6.1Installation Notes

OpenBSD/arm64 6.1Installation Notes

Packages

Quick install instructions

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

TrueOS 2017-02-22 Released – Rolling Release

trueos

Feb 24, 2017. TrueOS is a rolling release operating system based on FreeBSD. The TrueOS team has released a new snapshot of the operating system’s Desktop and Server editions. The new snapshot includes several bug fixes, a few new services and package updates. TrueOS 2017-02-22 also includes support for automounting devices and a new jail management utility: “Automounting – This new feature allows auto-detection and mounting of inserted USB devices. It also automatically unmounts USB devices when the user ceases accessing the device. See the blog post on automounting for more details about this useful new feature. New jail utilities jbootstrap (requires being run once to fetch base packages), jinit, and jdestroy are available. These support OpenRC development and add other functionality. See the blog post on these new jail utilities for more details.

Release announcement

Features

New Jail management utilities

New Automounting

TrueOS Pico

Sources

Handbook

Community

Download TrueOS-Desktop-2017-02-22-x64-DVD.iso

Download TrueOS-Desktop-2017-02-22-x64-USB.img

Download TrueOS-Server-2017-02-22-x64-DVD.iso

Download TrueOS-Server-2017-02-22-x64-USB.img

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    The command would likely be, under TrueOS/PCBSD:
        dd if=YourTrueOS.img of=/dev/da0 bs=1m 

where da0 is the device and number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

 

Happy TrueOS  😀

Calculate Linux 17 Released!

calculate-linux

30 December 2016 – Alexander Tratsevskiy has announced the release of Calculate Linux 17, a major update of the project’s Gentoo-based set of distributions designed for desktops (with a choice of KDE Plasma, MATE or Xfce) as well as servers: “We are happy to announce the release of Calculate Linux 17. Main changes: Timeless, a new server flavour, designed for those eager to try the development version of Calculate Utilities; GUI manager – updated appearance, including new own icons; command-line manager – one session for cl-console and cl-console-gui, so that you can switch between them freely; live USB – system startup possible without PulseAudio; numerous revisions in templates – new functions added, support provided for ‘or’ expressions, service launching, package linking, package version downgrade, ldif format; beta versions of the brand new Calculate Linux Desktop Cinnamon and Calculate Linux Desktop LXQt available in ‘nightly’ stages; up to 5000 binary packages are available in the Calculate repository”. Calculate Linux Desktop, featuring either the KDE (CLD), the MATE (CLDM) or the Xfce (CLDX) environment, Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS), Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Scratch Server (CSS) and Timeless.

100% compatibility with Gentoo

 

Release Announcement

Documentation

Support Forums

Disk partitioning

Installation Guide

A Portage introduction

Portage features

man portage – /etc/portage

man make.conf

USE flags

Ebuild scripts

Frequently Asked Questions

Update

Browse Packages

New Packages

List of USE Flags

Gentoo Linux Security Advisories

Building your system

Network configuration

Workstation Setup

Server Configuration

Donations

Contact

Download Calculate Linux Desktop 17 KDE i686

Download Calculate Linux Desktop 17 KDE x86_64

Download Calculate Linux Desktop 17 MATE i686

Download Calculate Linux Desktop 17 MATE x86_64

Download Calculate Linux Desktop 17 Xfce i686

Download Calculate Linux Desktop 17 Xfce x86_64

Download Calculate Linux Scratch 17 i686

Download Calculate Linux Scratch 17 x86_64

Download Calculate Directory Server 17 i686

Download Calculate Directory Server 17 x86_64

Download Calculate Scratch Server 17 i686

Download Calculate Scratch Server 17 x86_64

Download Timeless 17 i686

Download Timeless 17 x86_64

**md5sum about the iso**

—-

Packages
  • CLD (KDE desktop):
    1. KDE Frameworks 5.29, KDE Plasma 5.8.5, KDE Applications 16.12, LibreOffice 5.2.3.3, Firefox 50.1.0, Gimp 2.8.16, Clementine 1.3.1
    2. i686 - 1.92 G, x86_64 - 2.08 G
  • CLDM (MATE desktop):
    1. MATE 1.16, LibreOffice 5.2.3.3, Firefox 50.1.0, Claws Mail 3.14.1, Gimp 2.8.16, Clementine 1.3.1
    2. i686 - 1.53 G, x86_64 - 1.69 G
  • CLDX (Xfce desktop):
    1. Xfce 4.12, LibreOffice 5.2.3.3, Firefox 50.1.0, Claws Mail 3.14.1, Gimp 2.8.16, Clementine 1.3.1
    2. i686 - 1.44 G, x86_64 - 1.61 G
  • CDS (Directory Server):
    1. OpenLDAP 2.4.43, Samba 4.2.14, Postfix 3.1.2, ProFTPD 1.3.5b, Bind 9.10.3
    2. i686 - 644 M, x86_64 - 669 M
  • CLS (Linux Scratch):
    1. Xorg-server 1.18.4, Kernel 4.4.9
    2. i686 - 724 M, x86_64 - 823 M
  • CSS (Scratch Server):
    1. Kernel 4.4.39, Calculate Utilities 3.5.0.10
    2. i686 - 445 M, x86_64 - 471 M
  • Timeless (New server):
    1. OpenLDAP 2.4.43, Calculate Utilities 3.5.0.10
    2. i686 - 467 M, x86_64 - 493 M

 

To update from Calculate Linux old versions, either:

  • execute cl-update or
  • put the new iso file in /var/calculate/linux, then run cl-install.

 

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

Ubuntu 16.10 “Yakkety Yak” Released

ubuntu-16-10yakketyyak

13 October 2016 – Canonical has announced the release of a new version of its popular Ubuntu operating system. The latest version, Ubuntu 16.10, offers users many updated packages, a preview session of the Unity 8 desktop environment and version 4.8 of the Linux kernel. The distribution also features LibreOffice 5.2 and the update manager application now shows changelogs from enabled personal package archives (PPAs). “Network performance is a primary focus of this release, with updated versions of Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), OpenVSwitch (OVS) and virtualization technologies, all able to handle critical application traffic for lower latency and greater throughput. Ubuntu 16.10 and the corresponding updates to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS further enhance Ubuntu’s position as the leading private cloud infrastructure operating system, with OpenStack Newton, DPDK, enhanced OpenVSwitch and LXD machine containers alongside regular KVM based VM guests. Ubuntu 16.10 previews Canonical’s device convergence vision.

ReleaseNotes

Upgrading from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Linux Kernel 4.8

Desktop

Server

Official flavours

Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop 64

Ubuntu 16.10 Server 64

Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop i386

Ubuntu 16.10 Server i386

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot 64

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot i386

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot ARM64/ARMv8

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot ARMHF/ARMv7 1

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot ARMHF/ARMv7 2

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot PowerPC64EL/POWER8 Little-Endian

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot PowerPC 32 bit Big-Endian

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot PowerPC 64 bit Big-Endian

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot PowerPC e500mc Big-Endian

Ubuntu 16.10 Netboot s390x IBM system z

Ubuntu 16.10 Server 64 bit ARM (ARMv8/AArch64)

Ubuntu 16.10 Server Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5)

Ubuntu 16.10 Server PowerPC64 Little-Endian

Ubuntu 16.10 Server IBM z series mainframes (LinuxONE)

Usb Image Writing Guide

Kubuntu 16.10 Desktop 64

Kubuntu 16.10 Desktop i386

Xubuntu 16.10 Desktop 64

Xubuntu 16.10 Desktop i386

Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Desktop 64

Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Desktop i386

Ubuntu MATE PowerPC Macs and IBM

Ubuntu Studio 16.10 64

Ubuntu Studio 16.10 i386

Ubuntu Kylin 16.10 64

Ubuntu Kylin 16.10 i386

Lubuntu 16.10 64

Lubuntu 16.10 i386

Lubuntu 16.04 Alternate 64 (for low ram)

Lubuntu 16.10 Alternate i386

Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 i386

Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 64

MinimalCD

-= Ubuntu 16.10 will be supported for 9 months until July 2017. If you need Long Term Support, it is recommended you use Ubuntu 16.04 LTS instead.

yakketyyak

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

OpenBSD 6.0 Officially Released

openbsd_puffy60

The OpenBSD project has announced the release of OpenBSD 6.0. The OpenBSD project focuses on providing code and documentation that are correct and of high quality. This has lead to OpenBSD being regarded as a highly secure and reliable operating system. The new release features New/extended platforms: for armv7 – EFI bootloader added, kernels are now loaded from FFS instead of FAT or EXT filesystems, without U-Boot headers, a single kernel and ramdisk are now used for all SoCs, Miniroot installer images include U-Boot 2016.07 with support for EFI payloads, vax removed. Many new and improved hardware drivers and support for hardware-reduced ACPI implementations, for ACPI 5.0 implementations, initial support for MSI-X has been added, the xhci(4) driver now performs handoff from an xHCI-capable BIOS correctly, W^X is now strictly enforced by default etc.. Updated versions of LibreSSL and OpenSSH are included as well and feature several security enhancements.

Release announcement and quick installer information

Detailed log of changes

Errata page (CVS branch)

Song – Another Smash of the Stack

Song – Black Hat

Song – Money

Song – Comfortably Dumb (the misc song)

Song – Mother

Song – Goodbye

Upgrade Guide: 5.9 to 6.0

openbsd_banner

Download and install:

OpenBSD/macppc 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_64 bit 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/x86_32 bit 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/alpha 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/armv7 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/landisk 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/loongson 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/luna88k 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/hppa 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/octeon 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sgi 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/sparc64 6.0Installation Notes

OpenBSD/zaurus 6.0Installation Notes

Quick install instructions

openbsd_blackhat

Note: OpenBSD is a project released under the BSD 2-Clause license.
This license is recognized as free license, but is not copyleft.

P.S.

Creating a bootable USB key using a Un*x-like system:

    Some older systems may not be able to boot from USB keys or require
    changing boot priority.  Check your BIOS settings if you run into
    problems.

    First, you will need to obtain a local copy of the bootable filesystem
    image miniroot59.fs or install59.fs as described above.
    You should use the signify(1) and sha256(1) commands to verify
    the integrity of the images with the SHA256.sig file on the mirror site.

    Next, use the dd(1) utility to copy the file to the USB storage device.
    The command would likely be, under OpenBSD:
        dd if=miniroot59.fs of=/dev/rsdNc bs=1m

    where N is the device number.  You can find the correct device number
    by checking dmesg(8) when inserting the media.

    If you are using another operating system, you may have to adapt
    this to conform to local naming conventions for the USB key and
    options suitable for copying to a "raw" disk image.  The key
    issue is that the device name used for the USB key *must* be one
    that refers to the correct block device, not a partition or
    compatibility mode, and the copy command needs to be compatible
    with the requirement that writes to a raw device must be in
    multiples of 512-byte blocks.  The variations are endless and
    beyond the scope of this document.

    If you're doing this on the system you intend to boot the USB key on,
    copying the image back to a file and doing a compare or checksum
    is a good way to verify that the USB key is readable and free of
    read/write errors.

Happy OpenBSD  😀

Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Trusty Tahr released

Ubuntu-14-04-LTS

5 August 2016 – Adam Conrad has announced the release of Ubuntu 14.04.5, code-named “Trusty Tahr”, the fifth maintenance update of the distribution’s long-term support version originally released in April 2014 and supported with security updates until April 2019: “The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, Cloud and Core products, as well as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support. As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to be downloaded after installation.

Release Schedule

ReleaseNotes

Upgrading from Ubuntu 12.04 LTS or Ubuntu 13.10

Kernel 4.4 with Update Packages

Desktop

Server

Official flavours

Ubuntu 14.0.4.5 Desktop i386

Ubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Ubuntu 14.04.5 Server i386

Ubuntu 14.04.5 Server 64

Usb Image Writing Guide

Ubuntu GNOME 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Ubuntu GNOME 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Mythbuntu 14.0.4.5 Desktop i386

Mythbuntu 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Kubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Kubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Xubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Xbuntu 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Ubuntu Studio 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Ubuntu Studio 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Ubuntu Kylin 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Ubuntu Kylin 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Edubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Edubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Lubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop i386

Lubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop 64

Lubuntu 14.04.5 Desktop PowerPc and IBM PPC

Lubuntu 14.04.1 Alternate i386 (For low ram)

Lubuntu 14.04.1 Alternate 64

Lubuntu 14.04.1 Alternate Machintosh 64

-= Support guaranteed until April 2019

trusty_tahr

Happy GNU/Linux  😀

OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 and illumos – OpenSolaris

OpenIndiana

22/04/2016 – The OpenIndiana project, which is a continuation of OpenSolaris, has released a new version of the community-maintained operating system. The new release offers a number of improvements to package management and includes several package updates to such desktop applications as Firefox, Thunderbird and VLC. “New nlipkg zone brand was introduced, which behaves like old ipkg brand (i.e. it doesn’t check child and parent images for consistency). It’s possible to convert ipkg zone to nlipkg one. To do so, install system/zones/brand/nlipkg, change zone’s brand to nlipkg and remove /var/pkg/linked inside zone. Closed sysidtool which could be used to set initial system parameters on first boot and initialize zone’s configuration was replaced with sysding. All other packages from closed admin incorporation were also removed…

 

ReleaseNotes

Packages

Hipster Branch

illumos project

Hardware Compatibility List:

Laptops and Netbooks

Servers

Components

How to Upgrade from OpenSolaris

How to Upgrade OpenIndiana

How to Install OpenIndiana

illumos HLb

Mailing Lists

Frequently Asked Questions

OpenIndiana Bug Tracker

OpenIndiana Wiki

How does OpenIndiana compare to BSD or GNU/Linux?

IPS Guide (Image Packaging System Guide)

illumos project the OpenIndiana’s source tree

illumos Developer’s Guide

Does OpenIndiana provide a SPARC release?

 

Download:

Getting illumos Distributions

OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 Live DVD 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 Live USB 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 Text install CD 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 Text Install USB 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Legacy Build 151a8 Desktop DVD 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Legacy Build 151a8 Desktop USB 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Legacy Build 151a8 Server CD 64bit/i386

OpenIndiana Legacy Build 151a8 Server USB 64bit/i386

OpenSolaris Build 134 Text Install SPARC

OpenIndiana Legacy Build 151a8 unofficial Text Install SPARC

 

Note: Hipster Branch = unstable branch and Legacy = stable branch.

 

Happy OpenIndiana  😀